Animal Cruelty: Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China

photo-Shared a post - rgcorros

Shared a post – rgcorros

http://www.crazynews.net/animal-cruelty-live-animals-for-sale-as-key-chains-in-china/

 

Here is more sickness! I am sorry for all of the sickening posts as of late. I am truly disgusted at the audasity of our fellow man. I do understand the need to make money in this day and age, but the extremes humankind takes are sickening.

This article has two parts: The obviously cruel ways people use, to create wealth for themselves, and some of the ways people break the law, to smuggle live animals into other countries.

 

Posted on October 20, 2013 | Comments Off

photo-Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Despite the fact that the selling of animals as keyring ornaments is a clear-cut case of animal cruelty, it is actually entirely within the law. Chinese law prohibits the sale of wild animals — a designation which evidently does not apply to the Brazil turtles and kingfish being sold.

photo-Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Live Animals Being Sold as Keyrings in China

photo-Live Animals Being Sold as Keyrings in China _ TreeHugger

Live Animals Being Sold as Keyrings in China _ TreeHugger

http://www.treehugger.com/natural-sciences/live-animals-being-sold-as-keyrings-in-china.html
Keyring ornaments are perhaps the most useless item you’ll ever carry in your pocket or stuff in your purse — but now, thanks to an increasingly popular item being sold in China, it can easily be the cruelest, too. For the price you might expect to pay for some kitschy trinket, Chinese street vendors are selling live animals, permanently sealed in a small plastic pouch where they can survive for a short while as someone’s conversation piece. Apparently, these unimaginably inhumane keyrings are actually quite popular — and worst of all, it’s totally legal.

photo-Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Animal Cruelty_ Live Animals For Sale As Key Chains In China _ Crazy News

Potential buyers (read as animal-abusers) have the choice between a living Brazil turtle or two small kingfish, sealed in an airtight package along with some colored water. One vendor claimed that the trapped creatures “can live for months inside there” because the water contains “nutrients,” though veterinarians have already disputed this claim.

10 Outrageous Ways People Have Tried to Smuggle Animals

photo- Outrageous Ways People Have Tried to Smuggle Animals _ Page 2 _ TreeHugger

Outrageous Ways People Have Tried to Smuggle Animals _ Page 2 _ TreeHugger

http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/natural-sciences/10-outrageous-ways-people-have-tried-to-smuggle-animals/

When Miami airport inspectors asked a man arriving from Havana, Cuba to raise his pants legs, they were surprised to find 44 birds strapped to his legs. The man had denied he was bringing any wildlife into the United States. He was released the next day on $50,000 bond after being charged with lying on a customs declaration form.

photo-10 Outrageous Ways People Have Tried to Smuggle Animals _ TreeHugger

10 Outrageous Ways People Have Tried to Smuggle Animals _ TreeHugger

The illegal trade in wildlife is second only to that of drugs in the United States, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). A former FWS chief of law enforcement said, “There is no stigma attached to being an animal smuggler. If you get caught illegally transporting animals on a first offense, it’s possible you won’t even do jail time. You can’t say the same for running drugs.”

This bird pretends it’s a toxic, spiny caterpillar

This bird pretends it’s a toxic, spiny caterpillar

Pity the tasty nestlings of the cinereous mourner (Laniocera hypopyrra). One of many birds found in the subtropical lowland forests of South America, the species lives in an area where birds tend to suffer very high losses to nest predators. But the cinereous mourner has a handy trick up its wing. It does a rollicking (rolling, actually) sendup of a toxic, spiny caterpillar (Megalopyge) that also calls the area home (see photo below).

Mimicry in nature takes many forms – bugs that look like leaves, shapeshifting octopuses, seahorses indistinguishable from their coral climes. Whether as a way to hide from predators or to afford a sly way in which to entice prey, camouflage create no shortage of “wow” moments in nature. But the cinereous mourner assumes a particularly clever form of the art known as Batesian mimicry. In this form of biological trickery, the docile organism takes on the characteristics of a threatening or dangerous organism, thereby making itself highly unattractive to prospective predators.

© Wendy Valencia
And while this seems like a perfectly reasonable strategy of adaptation, it is one that is very rare in vertebrates, according to a study about the cinereous mourner published in The American Naturalist.

In the study, Gustavo A. Londoño, Duván Garcia, and Manuel Sánchez Martínez report what they found while working on a long-term avian ecological study in the Amazon. They discovered the second nest ever described for the cinereous mourner at Pantiacolla Lodge in the upper Madre de Dios River in southeastern Peru. And in it, they observed chicks with downy feathers with long orange barbs with white tips – no other nestlings in the area looked at all like them.

The unusual feathers caught their eyes, but the chicks’ behavior proved even more intriguing. They observed them moving their heads very slowly from side to side; while working nearby, they discovered a poisonous caterpillar with similar size and hair coloration as the nestling, as well as like movements. Describing the morphological and behavioral similarities between the nestlings and the caterpillars as “astonishing,” the cinereous mourner makes a splendid poster child for the strange and wonderful world of Batesian mimicry.

You can see the cinereous mourner’s caterpillar dance in the video below.

Tags: Birds