Google Data tools – Download your data!

Here is another useful piece of information.  Just like keeping a back-up copy of important data, you may want to keep a second copy of all of your personal data, where you can access it at a moments notice.  If the internet went down, and you needed your information in a hurry, hoe would you access it?

Put your data on a dvd, or a set of them, and tuck them away in your file boxes or safe, just in case.

John Skeats
Shared publicly8:36 AM

Think About Removing Your Data from a Service Before You Need to

Most people don’t give a thought to whether they would be able to export their personal content from online services until they need to because they want to change services or whatever. Unfortunately, they often find that the service providers have put up walls presumably to lock people in by making it difficult or impossible to export your content.

Google believes you own your content. They honor that by providing tools that allow you to export your content easily, at no cost, and in a standard format that can be used elsewhere.

h/t +Google+ Top Contributors

Google+ Top Contributors originally shared:

Google Data tools – Download your data

Your account, your data.
Download a copy.

Create an archive with your data from Google products:

Choose the Google products to include in your archive and configure the settings for each product. This archive will only be accessible to you.

It’s important that you can access your Google data when you want it, where you want it – whether is it to import it into another service or just create your own copy for your archives.

People usually don’t look to see if they can get their data out of a product until they decide that they want to leave. For this reason, we always encourage you to ask these three questions before starting to use a product that will store your data:

★ Can I get my data out in an open, interoperable, portable format?
★ How much is it going to cost to get my data out?
★ How much of my time is it going to take to get my data out?

The ideal answers to these questions are:

✫ Yes.
✫ Nothing more than I’m already paying.
✫ As little as possible.

There shouldn’t be an additional charge to export your data. Beyond that, if it takes you weeks to get your data, it’s almost as bad as not being able to get your data out at all.

https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/3024190?utm_content=buffer5410f&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Learn more from Google: http://bit.ly/1MH8L9J

Click through to the Takeout: http://bit.ly/1bdw1i1

#Google #Takeout #Photos #Maps #TCpost

1 Million Mini Computers So Kids Can Learn

BBC is give away 1 million mini computers so kids can learn

https://www.intspine.com/bbc-give-away-1-million-mini-computers-kids-can-learn-311499

 

BBC is giving away 1 million mini computers so kids can learn to code – LONDON — The BBC wants coding to become as fundamental as writing, and is taking some very practical steps to ensure that happens.

The broadcaster announced on Thursday that it is giving away 1 million micro computers to next year’s cohort of 11- and 12-year-old schoolchildren in Year 7, as part of a new initiative called Make it Digital.

Currently in development, the Micro Bit is a small piece of programmable, wearable hardware that helps kids learn basic coding and programming.

It could act as a springboard for more advanced coding on products, such as the single-board computer Raspberry Pi, according to the BBC. Children will be able to plug the device into a computer, and start creating with it immediately.

“BBC Make it Digital could help digital creativity become as familiar and fundamental as writing, and I’m truly excited by what Britain, and future great Britons, can achieve,” BBC director general Tony Hall said in a statement Thursday.

The broadcaster also announced it is partnering with 50 organisations, including Google, Google, Samsung, Samsungfor Good and Code Club, and will host a range of educational events and activities.

52 Signs Social Media Has Turned You Into A Complete Psychopath

52 Signs Social Media Has Turned You Into A Complete Psychopath

tumblr_njrvyrWUAS1tk6a7yo1_500

In this day and age, we love posting, tweeting, pinning, YouTubing and Instagramming.

Name the app, you’ve got an account. If it’s online, you’ve seen it. But, have you ever sat down and thought, “Am I doing this too much? Is it taking up a lot of my time?”

In other words, am I a social media psychopath? How far is too far? Check out this list to see if you qualify and check them off as you go along. Read it alongside your friends.

If you’ve done even one of them, you may be a crazy person. It’s time to see just how nuts we really are.

Have you done these things?

 

1. You constantly check someone’s Facebook. You do it day after day, without any real-life interaction, whatsoever. You don’t like any of the stuff he or she posts, but when you run into him or her, you mention you saw the statuses, posts and videos. You’re pretty much a ghost.

2. You post passive-aggressive statuses or photos. Things like, “Hahaha, you’ll see” and “Whatever,” trying desperately to get the attention of someone without realizing he or she probably hid you from his or her news feed six months ago.

3. You post inspirational or motivational quotes. Even if you’re just trying show your ex you’re not sad anymore and you’re doing fine, you’re clearly trying to get his or her attention. “We go through the valleys and the bumpy roads so that we can climb to the peaks.” WHAT?

4. You unfriend and re-friend like wildfire. But, you quickly cancel the re-friend request so you can be sure he or she knows what you did. You’re sick!

5. You like a status only to take said like away a mere seconds later.Mistake? Accidental like? Insane.

6. You block someone for a day and then unblock. Then, you re-friend and message, “hey what’s up :).”

7. You created an account on Yelp just to post a three-word review about that family-owned taco restaurant without any pertinent or detailed information. “This place sucks.”

8. You poke every single one of your friends. This takes all day. Unbelievable.

9. You create an event for your own birthday party and then cancel the event the night before.

10. You post a status and then remove it 10 minutes later. Why? Because the only person who liked it was your Aunt Sue who’s a court stenographer in Utah.

11. You send someone a message or comment, “That’s a great photo,” yet you hate it.

12. You tweet to your favorite celebrity how much you love him or her.Three minutes later, you tweet how much you hate him or her because your tweet went unacknowledged. Totally normal behavior.

13. You create a separate account to stalk people. You then appear on the show, “Catfish.”

14. You keep your wall protected so you have to approve photos and statuses you’re tagged in.Like, that one where your friends found you, ass-up with your face in the sand.

15. You have two tabs of Facebook open right now. WHY!?

16. You use 20 hashtags for every photo you post on Instagram.#likeme #pleaselikeme #likeforlike

17. You have an Instagram for your dog and post as if you were him or her.“Mmm, I love these Beggin’ strips.”

18. You report statuses and photos of people simply because you don’t like them.Like, for example, when they post about how they’re grateful they made it out if surgery alive.

19. You tweet to celebrities, “I know, right?” when you don’t know at all.They’re rich and you owe $3k on your credit card because you have an issue with Jose Cuervo.

20. You look at every tagged Facebook photo of someone, going backward in time.After that, it’s onto the albums: “Mmmm, beach season.”

21. You post a status or photo about how much you love your boyfriend or girlfriend when you just started dating a few days ago.“Omg, I love this man.” Then, you break up two days later and post, “Omg, never falling in love again. #devastated.”

22. You post on your significant other’s wall how much you love him or her when you’re sitting in the same room. You want the world to see how much you two love each other!

23. Every photo you’ve ever posted has been a selfie. Even worse, they’re all duck lips. Woof!

24. You’ve used the hashtag, “YOLO.”

25. You look at your ex’s new significant other’s Facebook and say out loud, “What a fugly goblin.” 

26. You have pulled up Facebook on your TV.

27. You take your phone in the bathroom and keep scrolling even though you’re done. In fact, you’ve been done for 15 minutes. CRAZY.

28. You tried to lead an exodus over to Google+ and lost a bunch of friends in the process.Even worse, then you tried Path.

29. Your profile picture is of your significant other. As in, you’re not even in the photo.

30. Your profile picture is of anyone other than you.

31. You suggest people you may know to people. Who are these people!? I don’t know any of them!!!

32. You start a group message with a couple without realizing they broke up a week ago.“Hey, you guys want to go dancing tonight?”

33. You start a group message with 30 people. “Hey, you guys want to go dancing tonight?”

34. You personally message people to invite them every time you have an event or you’ve posted a video or you’ve taken a sh*t.“Hey, I know we haven’t talked in four years, but please like this page. Thanks, bye.”

35. Your profile picture is of a part of your body other than your face.

36. You write, “dislike” on someone’s statuses or photos. Or even worse, you just write, “no.”

37. You’ve posted the Facebook privacy guidelines and won’t agree to them.As if someone was going through and crossing you off the list. WHY DID WE ALL DO THIS!?!

38. You’ve tagged 30 friends in a scareware status. It threatened them to tag 30 other people, and if they didn’t, they’d die a mysterious death next week.

39. You’ve edited a status by commenting on it after you’ve posted.You didn’t edit the actual status, which is completely possible.

40. You’ve liked your own statuses or photos. At some point in the process you also said out loud, “I’ll show them.”

41. You hooked up your Facebook to your Twitter and Instagram, as well as your Vine to your Twitter, so you never miss a beat.

42. You bought followers or likes and didn’t tell anyone about it.This skeleton stays in your closet for life.

43. You’ve posted, “I love my fans” or “Haters gonna hate.” You have 90 friends on Facebook.

44. You’ve said you’re in a relationship, even though you’re not.When someone says, “Who?” you just comment with a smiley face.

45. You post a photo of yourself flexing. Someone else must have had to take this photo. You live at home.

46. You posted a Photoshopped photo of you standing next to Marc Cuban on the cover of Forbes magazine.The caption was, “Living the life.”

47. You go to the mall and post photos of expensive sh*t you can’t possibly afford.Then you write, “I bet you wish you were me.”

48. You remove someone as a friend because he or she makes you jealous.

49. You’ve checked your notifications during a movie. You’re the person they’re talking to in the theater when they say, “Please, silence your phones and be courteous to the people around you.” GET OUT!

50. You fall asleep watching Vines. With your phone on your face, mind you.

51. You have walked into a lamppost, another person, or traffic while updating your status.

52. You read this list, confessed to all of them, and then said, “This author’s an assh*le — I’m not like that at all.”

Church Of The Good Shepherd

Dubie Bacino
Built in 1935, this is one of the most iconic and photographed church in New Zealand. Inside, the church’s altar window was purposely designed to frame the lake backed by the majestic snow capped mountains. Never have I seen beauty such as this.

Taken during our autumn 2014 photo safari, the clouds just lit up like fire and the photographers were buzzing around like crazy. Was lucky to position my self all alone on the opposite side, shot a few frames with different exposures and blended it together to showcase a well balanced light.

Sometimes a photo is just not enough to show you how beautiful a place is. – Patrick Marson Ong

www.facebook.com/patrickmarsonong

photo  Church Of  The Good Shepherd

Church Of The Good Shepherd

 

 

#newzealand #church #laketekapo

Dubie Bacino’s photos Church Of The Good Shepherd

Open Letter to Photographers on Google+

Most of you know me for sharing beautiful photographs. I am writing as there is something that’s been on my mind for some time now, the sensitive issue of Copyright Infringement – and I would really appreciate your feedback on this matter.

Crediting respective photographers is something I take very seriously. That was one of the main reasons I started posting photographs, to try to set some kind of example and standard for sharing images via social media. I am happy with the success I’ve had, since I have a large following of photographers themselves who often send me their work and ask me to share it. I have more than 100K followers on Google+, 50K followers on Twitter, and 25K subscribers on Facebook. Most of my posts go viral.

I do not use my social media stream to post commercial content, or to sell anything to anyone. I never claim to be a photographer and I always credit the respective photographers and provide the link to their website.

In my personal experience, photographers are generally happy to have their work exposed to a bigger audience as long as they are properly credited. Unfortunately, the copyright laws on social media are very loosely defined, and the last thing I’d want is to be accused of copyright infringement.

I don’t want to waste my time promoting photographers who don’t want to be promoted. And more importantly, I don’t want to offend anyone with my actions. I understand that an artist bares their soul when publishing to the world, and I also understand that a work of art can only gain value with more exposure. But in the end, there is such a fine line on the internet between promoting work and copyright. It would appear that even crediting all photographers there could always be someone who has a personal problem with how their work is promoted.

I am hoping to initiate a discussion on this subject as I would really like your opinion on how you perceive the work that I have put into this hobby. Let me know whether you want me to share your photographs or not.

 

The ideal length

https://blog.bufferapp.com/the-ideal-length-of-everything-online-according-to-science
The ideal length of a tweet is 100 characters
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The ideal length of a Facebook post is less than 40 characters
40-character posts received 86 percent higher engagement than others.
It was found significant advantages to ” question posts ” between 100 to 119 characters.
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The ideal length of a Google+ headline is less than 60 characters
In the last update, Google changed the layout of posts so that you only see three lines of the original post before you see “Read more” link. In other words, your first sentence has to be a gripping teaser to get people to click “Read More.”
The ideal length of a headline is 6 words. We tend to absorb only the first three words and the last three words of a headline.
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The ideal length of a blog post is 7 minutes, 1,600 words
(A photo-heavy post could bring the average down closer to 1,000. Medium’s seven-minute story on ideal post length was filled with images and graphs and contained 980 words.)
What it means is that it’s worth writing however much you really need. Don’t feel constrained by presumed short attention spans. If you put in the effort, so will your audience.
The ideal width of a paragraph is 40-55 characters. ( that’s the length of my previous statement) Content width can give the appearance of simplicity or complexity.
Content width is key to maximizing reader comprehension. The ideal paragraph length, in this sense, would appear simple to the reader and allow for easy reading.
The problem is, to ensure maximum comprehension and the appearance of simplicity, the perfect line length ranges between 40 and 55 characters per line, or in other words, a content column that varies between 250-350 pixels wide (it depends on font size and choice).
Forty and 55 characters per line means about 8 to 11 words.
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The ideal length of an email subject line is 28-39 characters. The general rule of thumb in email marketing is to keep your subject line to 50 characters or less. The exception was for highly targeted audiences, where the reader apparently appreciated the additional information in the subject line.

photo - open rates

Open Rates

photo - open rates

Top Open Rates

 

 

 

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The ideal length of a presentation is 18 minutes. The science behind this 18-minute mark comes from studies of attention spans. Scientists seem to agree on a range of 10 to 18 minutes for how long most people can pay attention before they check out.
It [18 minutes] is the length of a coffee break. So, you watch a great talk, and forward the link to two or three people. It can go viral, very easily. The 18-minute length also works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are used to going on for 45 minutes to bring it down to 18 minutes, you get them to really think about what they want to say. … It has a clarifying effect. It brings discipline.
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The ideal length of a title tag is 55 characters
Title tags are the bits of text that define your page on a search results page. Brick-and-mortar stores have business names; your web page has a title tag.

 

photo tag length

Tag Length

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Recent changes to the design of Google’s results pages mean that the maximum length for titles is around 60 characters. If your title exceeds 60 characters, it will get truncated with an ellipse. The design change can be seen below where a formerly ideal title has now been truncated.

 

photo - title length

Title Length with Keywords

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The ideal length of a domain name is 8 characters.
It is short
It is easy to remember
It is easy to spell
It is descriptive or brandable
It does not contain hyphens and numbers
It has a .com extension
An Alexa report that looked at the domains for the top 250 websites. The results: Over 70 percent of the sites had domain names of 8 characters or less, and the average number of characters per domain was just over 7.
https://blog.bufferapp.com/the-ideal-length-of-everything-online-according-to-science
This information by Kevan Lee