Climate Change To Accelerate At Pace Not Noticed in 1, 000 Years

All of the musicians are doing MASH_UPS these days, so I did a mash_up with the climate.
There might be climate change, and some of the effects are going to look just like the movie ” THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW “. Shifting weather patterns will be the norm for a long time to come, and if we continue to burn fossil fuels, the climate may never get back to what it was.

We do have the capability to utilize SOLAR, WIND, and TIDAL energy sources, and that can help some. Cars, factories, volcanoes and many other sources of carbon dioxide emissions will continue this current trend We have gone past, just turning off the lights we aren’t using. We need to be more energy-efficient and conservative with everything we do.

https://oigel.com/climate-change-accelerate-pace-not-noticed-1-000-years-302139?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=gplus

Climate Change To Accelerate At Pace Not Noticed in 1, 000 Years

Climate Change To Accelerate At Pace Not Seen In 1,000 Years – Climate change is accelerating at a rate not seen in 1,000 years, according to new findings. By the year 2020, global temperatures could be rising by nearly half a degree per decade, over twice the rate seen over the last 900 years, climatologists warn.

Over two dozen climate models were examined, with data arranged in 40-year cycles. This is roughly the length of time houses and roads tend to exist, before being replaced. Human activity is releasing vast quantities of carbon into the atmosphere, leading to climate change, including global warming, researchers warn.

Although the long-term effects of carbon on the environment can be simulated in computer models, short-term variations in weather make short-term predictions difficult. A base rate of global heating was determined for the period of 1850 to 1930, when human emissions of atmospheric carbon were much lower than in later decades.

Tree rings, ice cores and corals were examined, in order to create a record over global temperatures, stretching over the last 2,000 years. Investigators found that temperatures rarely rose more than 0.18 degrees Fahrenheit each decade, prior to the start of the 20th Century.

The climate is changing, sorry deniers but it’s true. A major happening is a large piece of a glacier in Antarctica has moved off of the shelf it was sitting on. The super cold freezes sea water, making fresh water ice, and allows the heavier salts to return to the bottom of the ocean. The iceberg that fell off of that shelf is the size of Rhode Island, and that will cause problems with the deep-sea currents.

The other problem is, a large lake under the ice sheets in Greenland has let go, dumping millions of gallons of cold fresh water into the northern end of the same deep ocean current. The two events happening at nearly the same time, has slowed down the Mid Atlantic Current.

That current carries the colder water to the tropics, and brings the heated waters north to the arctic.  With a slowdown in this current the climate will continue to show vast changes in weather patterns, we have not seen in present times.

Here is an info-graphic showing some of the major weather events just in the last year.

http://www.takepart.com/article/2015/03/24/atlantic-ocean-current-overturning-circulation-historic-slowdown-climate-change?cmpid=tpdaily-eml-2015-03-24
Significant Climate Anomalies And Events

Ocean Current Climate
(Infographic: Courtesy NOAA)
Via: TakePart.com

Giant Amphibian Ruled Ancient Rivers

Giant Amphibian Ruled Ancient Rivers

Scientists Want To Mine Your Poop For Gold

Scientists Want To Mine Your Poop For Gold

BY 03.23.15

uproxx_shutterstock_gold

SHUTTERSTOCK

When you think about it, humans are just really elaborate filtering machines. All sorts of stuff comes in to be broken down and processed by the body, after which the sh*t comes out. For most people, that’s where their vague interest in the subject ends. Crap is crap; it is universally understood to be worthless.

But that isn’t true at all, according to this Guardian article:

Sewage sludge contains traces of gold, silver and platinum at levels that would be seen as commercially viable by traditional prospectors. “The gold we found was at the level of a minimal mineral deposit,” said Kathleen Smith, of the US Geological Survey.

Smith and her colleagues argue that extracting metals from waste could also help limit the release of harmful metals, such as lead, into the environment in fertilisers and reduce the amount of toxic sewage that has to be buried or burnt.

“If you can get rid of some of the nuisance metals that currently limit how much of these biosolids we can use on fields and forests, and at the same time recover valuable metals and other elements, that’s a win-win,” she said.

A previous study, by Arizona State University, estimated that a city of 1 million inhabitants flushed about $13m (£8.7m) worth of precious metals down toilets and sewer drains each year.

So your butt may soon be the source of a new goldrush as investors jockey for the right to pan through your poop.

Scientists have estimated that an average ton of sewage sludge contains 0.4mg gold, 28mg of silver, 638mg copper and 49mg vanadium, which is used in cell phones so you know it’s hella valuable now. These amounts stayed relatively consistent across different sized cities and locales across the country. No word on if New Jersey poop yields are more potent due to the region’s ridiculous consumption of Goldschläger.

It’s been a great year for fecal sludge in the news – more and more processing plants are filtering out material useful for fertilizing crops. And Bill Gates recently drank the totally delicious output of a device that extracts clean water from human waste – great for water starved hellscapes where that kind of thing is necessary to survive. Or California in 10 years.

Source: The Guardian

SECRETS OF ARCHAEOLOGY: A Place Called Etruria (Ancient History)

A Place Called Etruria (Ancient History)
Published on Apr 6, 2014
SECRETS OF ARCHAEOLOGY: A Place Called Etruria (Ancient History Documentary)

Take a virtual reality tour of history’s most intriguing ancient civilizations. Uncover the secrets of the pyramids as the Pharaohs reach for immortality, walk the streets of the Eternal City of Rome, relive a step-by-step reconstruction of Pompeii under the shadow of mighty Vesuvius, experience life in bustling Baghdad and journey to Latin America to the mythical “El Dorado.” SECRETS OF ARCHAEOLOGY makes history come alive!

A PLACE CALLED ETRURIA
Go on a journey to the ancient cities Volterra, Populonia and Cervetari and see why Etruscan civilization was famous for its extravagant wealth, fine ceramics, handicrafts and bustling trade, and how it was all lost in battles with the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

Enigma Of The Etruscans part 1 – Documentary

Published on Feb 4, 2014
They taught the French to make wine and the Romans to build roads, and they introduced writing to Europe, but the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity’s great enigmas. No one knew exactly where they came from. Their language was alien to their neighbors. Their religion included the practice of divination, performed by priests who examined animals’ entrails to predict the future.

Much of our knowledge about Etruscan civilization comes from ancient literary sources and from tomb excavations, many of which were carried out decades ago. But all across Italy, archaeologists are now creating a much richer picture of Etruscan social structure, trade relationships, economy, daily lives, religion, and language than has ever been possible.

Excavations at sites including the first monumental tomb to be explored in over two decades, a rural sanctuary filled with gold artifacts, the only Etruscan house with intact walls and construction materials still preserved, and an entire seventh-century B.C. miner’s town, are revealing that the Etruscans left behind more than enough evidence to show that perhaps, they aren’t such a mystery after all.

Enigma Of The Etruscans part 2 – Documentary

Volcanic Lightning Forms Glass Balls

by Becky Oskin, Senior Writer | March 13, 2015 02:12pm ET
http://www.livescience.com/50137-volcanic-lightning-glass-balls.html?cmpid=559238

Inside towering clouds of volcanic ash, stunning lightning storms can create tiny crystal balls, a new study reports.

Researchers recently discovered smooth glass spheres in ash from explosive volcanic eruptions. Kimberly Genareau, a volcanologist at the University of Alabama, first spotted the orbs while scanning ash from Alaska’s 2009 Mount Redoubt eruption with a powerful microscope. She also found them in ash from Iceland’s 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption.

photo--Forged in a Flash_ Volcanic Lightning Forms Glass Balls

-Forged in a Flash_ Volcanic Lightning Forms Glass Balls

Both volcanoes blasted out billowing ash clouds that triggered spectacular displays of volcanic lightning. Inside these murky clouds, ash particles rub together, generating static electricity that discharges as lightning. [Big Blasts: History’s 10 Most Destructive Volcanoes]
https://www.youtube.com/user/NaturalezaSalvajeHD
Genareau and her colleagues said they think the lightning displays forged the glass balls from particles of volcanic glass. Their findings were published Feb. 27 in the journal Geology.

Volcanoes spit out jagged glass shards during eruptions, along with sharp scraps of rocks and minerals. But lightning within the ash cloudcan heat the air to 54,000 degrees Fahrenheit (30,000 degrees Celsius) for a few millionths of a second, melting the glass particles. These molten droplets then form into balls as they fall through the air, Genareau said.

photo-Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Researchers previously knew that volcanic eruptions could produce glass, but the new findings show how that glass can be made into spheres.

“You don’t need volcanic lightning to make glass [in ash], just to get that unusual shape,” Genareau told Live Science.

The round spherules from Mount Redoubt and Eyjafjallajökull are only 50 microns across (1/25,000th of an inch), hundreds of times smaller than the spherules that can be ejected during meteorite impacts. Fountaining lava caught by the wind can also form such glass spherules, called Pele’s tears.

photo--pele's tears - Google Search

-pele’s tears – Google Search

Some of the glass spherules examined in the study were as smooth as crystal balls, but others were hazed by cracks and pits that may have formed when water expanded into steam as the glass melted.

The research team is planning further studies into how and why the spherules formed. For instance, the scientists verified that a violent shock can produce glass spheres in ash when they found a version of the tiny balls in ash left over from experiments by researchers at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. In the experiments, the Canterbury researchers, who are also co-authors on the new findings, zapped artificial ash to investigate how volcanic ash disrupts high-voltage insulators. Their tests were similar to lightning discharges inside an ash cloud, Genareau said.

photo-Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Now, after studying samples from several eruptions, the researchers suspect that it is the size of the ash particles that determines whether the glass spheres appear after volcanic lightning strikes, Genareau said. All the spherules found so far are about 50 microns or smaller in size, she said. Larger ash fragments were partially melted, but didn’t completely transform into spherical shapes.

photo-Forged in a Flash_ Volcanic Lightning Forms Glass Balls

Forged in a Flash_ Volcanic Lightning Forms Glass Balls

Genareau said she hopes that the new discovery will spark a search for similar spheres in older ash deposits, which could provide new clues about where and when volcanic lightning strikes.

“Not much is known about how often volcanic lightning occurs, and this provides physical evidence that may be preserved in the geologic record,” she said.

photo-Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Electrifying Images of Volcano Lightning

Follow Becky Oskin @beckyoskin. Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Originally published on Live Science.
http://www.livescience.com/50137-volcanic-lightning-glass-balls.html?cmpid=559238

‘Hang Son Soong,’ the Largest Cave on Earth

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/03/an-aerial-tour-of-hang-son-soong-the-largest-cave-on-earth/

‘Hang Son Soong,’ the Largest Cave on Earth

Hang Son Doong, located in central Vietnam. Deboodt brought a drone and an array of cameras to help capture the cave system, the largest chamber of which is 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) long, 200 meters (660 ft) high and 150 meters (490 ft) wide. Despite its enormity, the cave was only discovered in 1991 by a local man, and it wasn’t even studied by scientists until about five years ago. One of the most disorienting thing about watching Deboodt’s film was my brain not comprehending the scale of what I was looking at. It’s only once you notice the ant-like people walking through some of the shots that you realize just how massive this place is. You can see more of Deboodt’s cave photography on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

https://vimeo.com/106048435

Above and Below
from Ryan Deboodt PLUS 6 months ago NOT YET RATED

A collection of timelapse footage from my travels including clouds in the would’s largest cave. I have been working on this project for awhile now and not yet fully finished. Shots from Vietnam, Myanmar, and Nepal.

Above and Below from Ryan Deboodt on Vimeo.

15 Craziest Natural Phenomena on Earth

15 Craziest Natural Phenomena on Earth

From oceans of blood to colossal blue holes filling the ocean floor, we count 15 of the most mysterious and beautiful natural phenomena ever to grace our planet.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDDGuides

A Few Of The Most Destructive Volcanoes

http://www.livescience.com/16679-most-destructive-volcanoes.html
Deccan Traps – Deccan Plateau, India – about 60 million years ago
Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

photo-Deccan Traps

Deccan Traps

The Deccan Traps are a set of lava beds in the Deccan Plateau region of what is now India that cover an area of about 580,000 square miles (1.5 million square kilometers), or more than twice the area of Texas. The lava beds were laid down in a series of colossal volcanic eruptions that occurred between 63 million and 67 million years ago. The timing of the eruptions roughly coincides with the disappearance of the dinosaurs, the so-called K-T mass extinction (the shorthand given to the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction). Evidence for the volcanic extinction of the dinosaurs has mounted in recent years, though many scientists still support the idea that an asteroid impact did the dinosaurs in. Above is an aerial photo of the Lonar Crater in India, which rests inside of the Deccan Plateau, the massive plain of volcanic basalt rock left over from the eruption.

Yellowstone Supervolcano – northwest corner of Wyoming, United States – about 640,000 years ago

Credit: Nina B | shutterstock

photo-Yellowstone Supervolcano

Yellowstone Supervolcano

The history of what is now Yellowstone National Park is marked by many enormous eruptions, the most recent of which occurred about 640,000 years ago, according to the United States Geological Survey. When this gigantic supervolcano erupted, it sent about 250 cubic miles (1,000 cubic kilometers) of material into the air. The eruptions have left behind hardened lava fields and calderas, depressions that form in the ground when material below it is erupted to the surface. The magma chambers thought to underlie the Yellowstone hotspot also provide the park with one of its enduring symbols, its geysers, as the water is heated up by the hot magma that flows underneath the ground. Some researchers have predicted that the supervolcano will blow its top again, an event that would cover up to half the country in ash up to 3 feet (1 meter) deep, one study predicts. The volcano only seems to go off about once every 600,000 years, though whether it ever will happen again isn’t known for sure. Recently though, tremors have been recorded in the Yellowstone area. The midway geyser basin in Wyoming’s Yellowstone National Park, current day.

Thera – island of Santorini in the Aegean Sea – sometime between 1645 B.C. and 1500 B.C.

Credit: mathom | shutterstock

photo-Thera – island of Santorini in the Aegean Sea

Thera – island of Santorini in the Aegean Sea

While the date of the eruption isn’t known with certainty, geologists think that Thera exploded with the energy of several hundred atomic bombs in a fraction of a second. Though there are no written records of the eruption, geologists think it could be the strongest explosion ever witnessed. The island that hosted the volcano, Santorini (part of an archipelago of volcanic islands), had been home to members of the Minoan civilization, though there are some indications that the inhabitants of the island suspected the volcano was going to blow its top and evacuated. But though those residents might have escaped, there is cause to speculate that the volcano severely disrupted the culture, with tsunamis and temperature declines caused by the massive amounts of sulfur dioxide it spewed into the atmosphere that altered the climate. Above is how the volcanic island of Santorini looks now.

Mount Vesuvius – Pompeii, Roman Empire (now Italy) – 79

Credit: Katie Smith Photography | shutterstock

photo-Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius is a so-called stratovolcano that lies to the east of what is now Naples, Italy. Stratovolcanoes are tall, steep, conical structures that periodically erupt explosively and are commonly found where one of Earth’s plates is subducting below another, producing magma along a particular zone. Vesuvius’ most famous eruption is the one that buried the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum in rock and dust in 79, killing thousands. The ashfall preserved some structures of the town, as well as skeletons and artifacts that have helped archaeologists better understand ancient Roman culture. Vesuvius is also considered by some to be the most dangerous volcano in the world today, as a massive eruption would threaten more than 3 million people who live in the area. The volcano last erupted in 1944.

Laki – Iceland – 1783
Credit: smcfeeters | shutterstock

photo-Laki – Iceland

Laki – Iceland

Iceland has many volcanoes that have erupted over the course of history. One notable blast was the eruption of Laki volcano in 1783. Above is the Laki island of Iceland, modern day. The eruption freed trapped volcanic gases that were carried by the Gulf Stream over to Europe. In the British Isles, many died of gas poisoning. The volcanic material sent into the air also created fiery sunsets recorded by 18th-century painters. Extensive crop damage and livestock losses created a famine in Iceland that resulted in the deaths of one-fifth of the population, according to the Smithsonian Institution’s Global Volcanism Program. The volcanic eruption, like many others, also influenced the world’s climate, as the particles it sent into the atmosphere blocked some of the sun’s incoming rays.

Ancient Sea Monster Was One of Largest Arthropods

http://www.livescience.com/50111-photos-anomalocaridids-morocco-fossil.html

by Laura Geggel, Staff Writer
Filter feeder

photo-Photos_ Ancient Sea Monster Was One of Largest Arthropods

Photos_ Ancient Sea Monster Was One of Largest Arthropods

A remarkably well-preserved fossil of a 480-million-year-old sea monster is helping researchers understand the evolution of arthropods. The creature, an anomalocaridid, has not one but two sets of legs on each of its body segments, showing that it’s an ancestor of modern-day arthropods, which include arachnids, insects and crustaceans. [Read the full story on the ancient anomalocaridid found in modern-day Morocco]

Side view with dorsal fins sticking up

photo-Photos_ Ancient Sea Monster Was One of Largest Arthropods- Fossil

Photos_ Ancient Sea Monster Was One of Largest Arthropods- Fossil

Here’s an illustration of the anomalocaridid (Aegirocassis benmoulae), a giant filter feeder that ate plankton and lived in the Early Ordovician period about 480 million years ago. The animal measured about 7 feet (2 meters) long, and is one of the largest arthropods that ever lived.
http://www.livescience.com/50112-anomalocaridid-detailed-fossil.html

Endangered Earth Online

Suit Launched to Protect Pollinators, Frogs From New Pesticide

Karner blue butterfly

The Center for Biological Diversity and other public-interest groups notified the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday of our intent to sue over its failure to protect a range of federally protected species — including bees, butterflies, amphibians and birds — from a powerful, newly approved insecticide called “insecticide.”

Even though the EPA recognized the chemical could harm endangered species, it didn’t consult with any wildlife agencies to protect those species. The insect poison could be particularly harmful to solitary bees that are often important crop pollinators — 4,000 species of which live in the United States.

“This systemic insecticide makes a plant highly toxic to any birds, butterflies and bees that feed on it, but the EPA has turned a blind eye and approved it without considering how it will hurt imperiled wildlife like the endangered Karner blue butterfly,” said Lori Ann Burd, director of the Center’s new Environmental Health program. “It’s our government’s duty to investigate how dangerous insecticides might affect wildlife — not just rubberstamp their approval.”

Read more in The Oregonian.


Feds Ban Imports on Four Large Constrictor Snakes — Thank You

Reticulated python

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has just made it illegal to import four kinds of nonnative constrictor snakes — or sell them across state lines — by adding them to the list of “injurious” wildlife under a law called the Lacey Act. This should prevent widespread introduction of these exotic animals, which can be extremely destructive to U.S. ecosystems and our own native species.

In 2010 scientists identified nine snakes as posing an unacceptable risk of establishing invasive populations; two years later the agency said four of those species would be listed as “injurious”: Burmese pythons, yellow anacondas, and northern and southern African pythons. And now the Service has announced that it will list four of the remaining five snakes under the Lacey Act — the reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, green anaconda and Beni anaconda.

Last summer the Center submitted comments on a proposed rule that identified numerous scientific studies documenting the risk posed by exotic constrictor snakes. About 30,000 Center supporters backed our efforts, writing to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to ask that the remaining snakes be listed as injurious. The Center — and the snakes that won’t be trafficked — thank you.

Read more in The New York Times.


Help Bring Northwest Grizzly Bears Back From the Brink — Take Action

Grizzly bear cub

The grizzly bears of the Pacific Northwest could soon get some much-needed help from the feds: The National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service have declared they’ll be teaming up to restore a healthy grizzly population to the North Cascades, bringing in bears from neighboring areas. Now the agencies need to hear from you to know these massive, iconic bears have your full support.

The rugged North Cascades mountain range is key to grizzly survival in the lower 48, according to scientists … but only six bears are currently living there. Since they earned Endangered Species Act protection in 1975, grizzlies have begun to recover — but some populations could still disappear, so they all must be expanded to counter threats like climate change, development and logging.

The Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service have waited years to invite public input on their plan for Cascades grizzlies — so we have to act quickly.

Voice your support now for grizzly recovery in the Cascades to keep this project and these bears moving forward.


Become a Monthly Sustainer

San Leandro City Council Says No to Dangerous Oil Train Project

Oil train

San Leandro, Calif., became the latest city to oppose a proposed Phillips 66 oil train offloading facility in San Luis Obispo County when its city council unanimously passed a resolution Monday urging county supervisors to deny the project’s permit. The San Leandro Teachers’ Association and San Leandro Unified School District are also opposed.

If approved the facility would bring mile-long oil trains, carrying 2.5 million gallons of crude, through densely populated areas nearly every day. Oil train traffic in the United States has increased more than 4,000 percent since 2008 — bringing with it a steep rise in derailments, spills and explosions, with more oil spilled in rail accidents in 2013 than in the previous four decades combined.

“I look out my classroom door every day at the trains going by on the Capitol Corridor,” said schoolteacher Claudia McDonagh. “With the recent exploding derailments in West Virginia and Illinois it becomes easy to imagine one of those mile-long oil bomb trains coming off the tracks and into my classroom.”

Read more in our press release.

Oil Waste Is Contaminating California’s Underground Water, Officials Admit

Contaminated water

Facing tough questions from California lawmakers, state regulators admitted last week that oil companies are contaminating underground water by dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into protected aquifers.

Documents obtained by the Center had already shown that oil companies were allowed to drill about 2,400 illegal injection wells for waste disposal or oil production into protected aquifers, including many with water clean enough to drink.

But last week’s state Senate hearing confirmed the dire consequences. “We believe that any injection into the aquifers that are non-exempt has contaminated those aquifers,” water official Jonathan Bishop told lawmakers.

This illegal dumping contaminates water because fracking flowback and other oil waste contain cancer-causing chemicals like benzene. But Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators have so far shut down just 23 of the illegal wells, so we have much more work to do.

“If Gov. Brown doesn’t halt fracking and illegal waste water injection, Californians will bitterly regret the damage done to our water supply,” said the Center’s Kassie Siegel.

Learn more about these illegal oil industry wells via our new interactive map.


Help Give Away New Endangered Species Condoms for Earth Day — Sign Up Now

Endangered Species Condoms

At the very first Earth Day in 1970, the world’s rapidly growing human population was a central part of the conversation. But now, 45 years and 3.5 billion more people later, population growth is rarely talked about.

You can help change that by joining the Center’s Endangered Species Condoms project.

Every year we give away tens of thousands of free condoms in packages featuring wildlife threatened by humans’ runaway population and overconsumption. And this Earth Day we’re launching a new lineup of Endangered Species Condoms with different species; new artwork; new slogans; and new, sustainable, fair-trade Sustain brand condoms — but we need volunteers to help us distribute them at events and in communities across the country.

The deadline to sign up to be an Earth Day condom distributor is March 25. Even if you’ve signed up in the past, we need you to confirm your contact information and current mailing address. Sign up to volunteer and get a sneak preview of our new condom designs.


Take Action

Dozens Die in South Pacific Superstorm, Island President Faults Climate Change

Cyclone

When Cyclone Pam hit the South Pacific island of Vanuatu last weekend, at least 24 people died — and the massive storm flattened buildings, wrecked infrastructure, and left more than 3,000 survivors displaced.

Right after the storm hit, Vanuatu President Baldwin Lonsdale warned that climate change was contributing to more extreme weather conditions, specifically cyclone seasons, in his region — like those that caused Pam. In an affecting speech, he also lamented other climate change-related phenomena threatening his country.

“We see the level of sea rise,” Lonsdale said. “The cyclone seasons, the warm, the rain, all this is affected. … This year we have more than in any year. … Yes, climate change is contributing to this. I am very emotional. … We do not know if our families are safe. As the leader of the nation, my heart hurts for the people.”

Read more in The Guardian.


Wild & Weird: Did Man’s Best Friend Cause the Neanderthal Extinction?

Neanderthals

For millennia Neanderthals raised their young, buried their dead, hunted, laughed and lived in the presence of a daunting variety of Pleistocene Eurasian megafauna: giant cave bears, saber-toothed tigers, huge lions, woolly rhinos and leopards. But then, some 40,000 years ago — in what amounts to the blink of an eye in evolutionary time — Neanderthals and that host of megafauna nearly all fell to extinction. No single prevailing theory has yet explained the event.

But we do know that modern humans showed up in Neanderthal territory not long before the Neanderthals disappeared. A new book by retired anthropology professor Pat Shipman puts forth the hypothesis that modern humans, and their alliance with another apex predator, the wolf-dog, allowed the newcomers to hunt more efficiently than Neanderthals. Through domestication of wolves, humans were able to hunt many species, like mammoths, that Neanderthals rarely challenged.

Read more on Pat Shipman’s book The Invaders: How Humans and Their Dogs Drove Neanderthals to Extinction, including an interview with the author, in National Geographic.


Kierán Suckling
@KieranSuckling
Executive Director

Here is the link to the web site http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/

There are many more issues going on, so don’t hesitate to take a look at the web site.